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Published: 16 Oct 2017

Blou Reier/Grey Heron

Die bloureier is ‘n standvoël van die familie Ardeidae en inheems aan die matige klimaat dele van Europa en Asië asook dele van Afrika. Die bloureier se Engelse naam is Grey heron.  Die bloureier is ‘n groot voël: 90–100 cm lank met ‘n 175–195 cm vlerkspan en ‘n gewig van 1–2 kg. Sy vere is meestal blou-grys bo-op en ‘n vuilwit aan die onderkant. Volwassenes het ‘n wit kop met ‘n breë wit voorkop, terwyl jong voëls ‘n grys kop het. Die voël het ‘n kragtige pienk-geel bek, wat breër is by parende volwassenes. Die bloureier vlieg stadig, met sy lang nek in ‘n “S”-vorm teruggetrek.

The grey heron (Ardea cinerea) is a long-legged predatory wading bird of the heron family, Ardeidae, native throughout temperate Europeand Asia and also parts of Africa. It is resident in much of its range, but some populations from the more northern parts migrate southwards in autumn. A bird of wetland areas, it can be seen around lakes, rivers, ponds, marshes and on the sea coast. It feeds mostly on aquatic creatures which it catches after standing stationary beside or in the water or stalking its prey through the shallows.

Standing up to a metre tall, adults weigh from 1 to 2 kg (2.2 to 4.4 lb). They have a white head and neck with a broad black stripe that extends from the eye to the black crest. The body and wings are grey above and the underparts are greyish-white, with some black on the flanks. The long, sharply pointed beak is pinkish-yellow and the legs are brown.

The birds breed colonially in spring in “heronries”, usually building their nests high in trees. A clutch of usually three to five bluish-green eggs is laid. Both birds incubate the eggs for a period of about 25 days, and then both feed the chicks, which fledge when seven or eight weeks old. Many juveniles do not survive their first winter, but if they do, they can expect to live for about five years.

In Ancient Egypt, the deity Bennu was depicted as a heron in New Kingdom artwork. In Ancient Rome, the heron was a bird of divination. Roast heron was once a specially-prized dish; when George Neville became Archbishop of York in 1465, four hundred herons were served to the guests.

 

Published: 16 Oct 2017

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